Clela

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Clela

(she/her/hers)

Most of you know my story of how I became an ally. If you don't, google my name and you will learn more than you ever wanted to know about the Boulder County same-gender marriage licenses of March/April 1975. I was only 31 at the time, and it took me another 30 years before I even knew that I could call myself an LGBTQ 'ally'. Then it took many years more to learn how to be a 'good ally'! I try hard to keep my mind and my heart open to learning something new every day.

On Friday, May 18th, Dave Ensign, Mardi Moore and I went to Denver to appear before the Colorado History Review Board where they were considering an amendment to the Historic Designation of the Boulder County Courthouse. On this little trip to Denver, Mardi informed me that the Community is now trying to use the phrase "Ally to Accomplice". I've been thinking about this for days now and wondering, sincerely, how one moves to the 'accomplice' phase? Am I doing enough? Have I lethargically settled into just being content with being called an ally? After all, I can no longer march or participate in many activities. I am a weekly volunteer at the Longmont office, but so many of you spend countless hours in active support of Out Boulder County. Is speaking up for LGBTQ equality at every opportunity enough? Not now - not today - where equality gains are being rolled back at an alarming rate by our current administration. I am no longer a student -- but many of you are and can make a difference in your school. I am no longer employed -- but many of you are and can push through company policies that guard equal treatment. Many of you are participating in local political campaigns and have been to countless demonstrations and offer your time on an almost daily basis. And many, many of you are members of the LGBTQ Community where you shore up others every single day. You are definitely "accomplices".Now, more than ever, we must all stay the course. Now, more than ever, we must show up and never, ever stay quietly on the sidelines.